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Bad Effects of Neuropsychiatric On Traumatic Brain Injury

psychiatrist comes across patients whose problems are at least in part related to the neuropsychiatric consequences (behavioral, cognitive, and emotional) of traumatic brain injury (TBI). TBI affects approximately 2 of every 1000 persons per year. Those who are vulnerable to mental illness (eg, persons with alcohol abuse or antisocial personality disorder) are particularly at risk. Patients with TBI often have poor insight and may need hospitalization for their own safety. The neuropsychiatric and other sequelae are long-term; a head injury is for life.

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A telling illustration from 1937 by Courville, a neuropathologist, nicely demonstrates why TBI is of interest to psychiatrists (see figure 1 in Fleminger 20091). The illustration is a composite of the location of contusions found in 50 patients who died of TBI. The sites of specific vulnerability to contusions are the medial orbital frontal lobe and the anterior temporal lobes (Figure 1). Areas where contusions rarely occur include the primary motor, somato-sensory, and visual cortex. Therefore, areas of the brain concerned with social function and decision making are particularly vulnerable.2 It is unsurprising that neuropsychiatric sequelae outstrip neurophysical sequelae as the major cause of disability after TBI.

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